Beware of These Scams During the Coronavirus Pandemic

As you take precautions to protect yourself from the coronavirus, don’t forget to safeguard your financial well-being from fraudsters who are hoping to cash in on the paranoia. Here’s how you can identify scams that are currently being used and what you can do to ensure you are shielded from fraud during the pandemic. 


Well this escalated quickly.

The coronavirus is a devastating pandemic that is making a massive impact on the economy and health care systems all across the world. As of March 20, the world has experienced over 267,000 cases of the virus and although Canada is only representing a small portion of that total with 925 cases, we are in uncharted territory. Terms like “social distancing” and “self monitoring” have become second nature in (remote) conversation and we’ve all been exchanging shows to binge on Netflix during our two week long self-isolation periods.

This is truly an unsettling time where paranoia and panic are running rampant. Unfortunately, like a virus themselves, fraudsters and scammers feed on this urgency and as if we didn’t have enough to worry about, with the increase in global coverage comes an increase in fraud activity. Let’s make sure you are briefed and safeguarded against the types of fraud to watch out for so you can focus on protecting yourself from the global pandemic.

Fraudulent Health Products & Professionals

Fraudsters know that during a pandemic, your anxiety surrounding your health skyrockets and you’ll do whatever it takes to ensure you and your family are protected. From the moment that the coronavirus hit the global media, scammers were creating fake products that claim to boost your immune system, cure you from symptoms and, in some instances, have access to a vaccine.

The sad truth of the matter is that although they are in development, we are likely a year away from having a vaccine available and there are no approved drugs to prevent the virus. The websites and messages that these scammers are sending are chocked full with convincing information on the product, faux testimonials, professional sounding terms like “clinical trial” and even conspiracy theories about their company having access to a vaccine that the pharmaceutical industry is withholding for money. We’ve also seen con artists who are impersonating World Health Organization professionals with alleged access to information on a miracle drug. These con artists have been sending emails with important updates on the virus that prompts readers to click on a phishing link or download malicious software.

How you can protect yourself: Caution will prevail here. As long as you know that any medical information, especially on vaccines or treatment, will come directly from your healthcare professional and not from a link from a suspicious email address – you’ll know not to click anything or entertain any offers for a miracle drug. Be suspicious of products and “professionals” that have cured the virus and when in doubt, check with your health care professional.

Fake Charities & Fundraising Efforts

Another tactic that fraudsters employ is to pull on your heart strings. With the coronavirus affecting so many small businesses and charities, many are calling for aid in order to navigate these tough waters. Scam emails and phone calls have been going out to try and trick people into donating to fake charities and relief efforts. They may say that they are looking for a small donation but as soon as they have your credit card number or authorization, they have access to take as much as they want.

In addition, you may see a few GoFundMe pages pop up on social media feeds to rally monetary support to offset expenses that affected families are incurring due to the virus. Most of these pages are started by incredibly generous people in order to provide support for families in a time of need, but unfortunately, scammers and fraudsters have also taken advantage of this method.

How you can protect yourself: Unless you know the family that is garnering the support or someone you know can vouch for them, it is safest to move along from any GoFundMe page or fundraising websites calling for monetary support. If you do want to contribute some money to a relief fund, consider experienced or established relief organizations, especially those that clearly describe the use of the funds. Beware of scammers impersonating those organizations, though!

Face Mask Scams

Yes, these are a thing. Scammers are actually capitalizing on the high demand for face masks. Many different websites and organizations claiming to sell face masks online are attempting to lure you in by showing they have a limited amount of stock available. Why is this effective? The urgency and scarcity for an in-demand product will increase the likelihood of an impulsive purchase. It’s the same method that infomercials employ with “Act now before it’s gone!” messaging. The Red Cross has actually issued a warning that scammers are posing as them to solicit face mask purchases through text messages.

How you can protect yourself: Whether it is face masks, hand sanitizer or another product you are buying to protect yourself and your loved ones, make sure you are keeping an eye out for phony e-commerce sites and scams. If your gut is telling you that something “just doesn’t feel right” or “it seems too good to be true”, it most likely is. Only purchase from stores and websites with an established reputation. The most effective way to avoid a scam is to buy directly from a seller you are familiar with and who you already trust. When in doubt, make sure the seller has legitimate contact information, a real street address and a customer service number you can call before you hand over your name, address and credit card number.


It has yet to be seen how long the coronavirus will remain classified as a pandemic, but heightened fraud activity will be a constant throughout. Remain vigilant to avoid scams related to the virus, use caution when giving out your credit card information to e-commerce and relief efforts,  and look out for fake cures, phony prevention measures, and other coronavirus cons. We’ll get through this – but let’s make sure your financial well-being does, too.

The Great Buy vs. Lease Debate

It’s one of the most hotly contested debates of our time: Is buying or leasing a new vehicle the way to go?

Depending on who you ask, you’ll typically get a passionate and definitive answer based on personal experience. This blog weighs the pros and cons for each alternative and attempts to crown a victor. Spoiler alert: it’s not as clear cut as you may think. 


I currently drive a 2011 Ford Escape that has been an absolute dream for the past nine years. For about a year and a half, I’ve been contemplating trading it in for an upgrade but I’ve really enjoyed not having to worry about a monthly vehicle payment. The thought of trading in my SUV remained dormant in the back of my mind until one day when I was driving on Ring Road (Regina’s controlled highway that circles the city) and it hit me!

No, it actually hit me. Mid-transit, my hood flew up and smashed my windshield which left me travelling at 80 km/h on Regina’s main expressway without being able to see in front of me. Once I somehow safely navigated my way to the side of the road and got over the shock of what had just transpired, the first thing that went through my head was “it’s time for a new vehicle.”

In the past, I’ve always bought my vehicles (because that’s what Dad had always told me to do) but I’ve noticed that leasing is growing in popularity. Before I jumped on the same path, I decided to do my research to figure out the answer to the age-old question: “lease or buy?” Let’s break down both sides:

The Case for: Buying

  • No limits on the amount of kilometers you drive. Drive it off the lot and into the ground if you want! When you lease, you have a maximum amount of annual kilometers that you have to stay under without paying a penalty.
  • Your monthly payments will likely be higher than leasing, but you are paying to own. Eventually you will pay off your vehicle and will eliminate your monthly payment. I just spent five years without a vehicle payment and it made an enormous difference to my budget.
  • Freedom to customize, sell or trade in whenever you want. The vehicle is yours so feel free to put in those customized velvet seat covers to match the fuzzy dice hanging from your rear view mirror. You can’t do that under a lease.
  • No transactional fees. Depending on who you are leasing from, they may charge a “transaction fee” when you exchange your vehicle or buy it out at the end of your lease. Dealerships will claim it is to cover the paperwork that needs to be done, but these can usually be negotiated down before you sign your lease. Leasing will also require you to purchase a package policy on your insurance so be prepared for that expense as well.
  • Cheaper in the LONG run. Assuming your vehicle doesn’t require a ton of repairs once your warranty runs out and we’re operating in a stable market, purchasing is typically cheaper in the long run. Although your monthly payments will be more expensive compared to leasing, you will likely only need to pay for maintenance once you’ve paid off your vehicle. On the other hand, leasers will always have a monthly payment. In addition, you’ll be able to sell or trade-in your vehicle which will earn you a big chunk of change towards your next vehicle.
  • You don’t always have to buy new. Buying can be A LOT cheaper if you buy a used vehicle. Depending on how used the vehicle is, you will be incurring more risk for repairs but if you do your due-diligence, this can drastically boost your budget.

The Case for: Leasing

  • Cheaper in the SHORT term. Your monthly payments will be lower than financing a new vehicle. This allows you some more capacity to cover your monthly expenses and the ability to drive a newer vehicle without busting your budget.
  • Better warranty protection. Last year, I had to pay a couple hundred dollars to have my spark plugs changed. Apparently this can be done for much cheaper if you know how to do it yourself but if you are like me and feel incredibly accomplished after hanging a picture frame – finding coverage to make these repairs is definitely the best route. When leasing, the only thing you’ll need to worry about is regular upkeep (oil changes, car washes, etc.) and any damage subject to your deductible if you cause an accident.
  • New car every 2-4 years. When you finance a car, it will typically take you 3-5 years to pay it off and then you’ll likely spend another couple of years enjoying a life with no monthly car payment. By the time you are ready to trade-in your car, you’ll be craving the newest features. After driving without them for ten years, I would be tempted to take heated seats and a backup camera over a functional airbag at this point. A lease allows you to drive a new vehicle every 2-4 years which will help quiet your hankerings to sacrifice safety for comfort.
  • No money up front. When you are purchasing or financing a new vehicle, you’ll likely need to put down a big chunk of money in order to unlock smaller interest rates and shrink your monthly payments to a point where they won’t eat you alive. Buying instead of leasing typically takes more time as you’ll need to save for a while before you are ready to put a down payment on a car. You should obviously take some time to ensure leasing a new car fits your budget, but once you’ve made that decision, not having to pay any money up front can put you in the drivers seat of your new vehicle much faster.
  • Tax break if you are using it for business purpose. There are some tax advantages if you are leasing a car and using it for business purposes. Turbo Tax Canada breaks down these benefits in this article, but you can deduct the business percentage of your lease payments on your income tax. For instance, if you own your own business, your annual lease payment is $4,000 and you use your car for 75% business use – you may be able to deduct $3,000 on your annual tax return.
  • Easier to budget and no unexpected, expensive trips to the service department. I mentioned my spark plug struggle above, but that costly experience came when I took my post-warranty vehicle to the dealership to check out why my rear-windshield wiper fluid squirter (I’m quite confident this isn’t the technical term) was not working. This quick trip turned into an unexpected $2,000 purchase that included new brake pads, spark plugs, a new wiper squirter (again, not the technical term) and a few other things. This unexpected cost not only ruined my day, but it completely threw off my monthly budget and sentenced me to a month of eating ramen noodles. Because you’re always under warranty while leasing, your monthly payments are expected and you don’t need to worry about unexpected issues that will quickly burn a hole in your wallet and your budget.
  • No trade-in hassles at the end of the lease. Whether you are privately selling your car or looking to trade it in, it’s a huge hassle. Assuming you aren’t looking to buy-out the rest of your vehicle and you kept your vehicle in good condition, the end of your lease is quite hassle free. If you are continuing with a new lease, all you have to do is drive up with your old vehicle and drive off with a new one.

The Verdict: It Depends.

I know, I know – that’s the answer that nobody likes but it’s true. The good news is that there really is no wrong answer, but the trick is finding the best solution for you and your lifestyle. This decision is comparable to whether you want to buy or rent a house. Buying allows you more freedom to customize and is generally cheaper in the long-term, where renting removes the hassle of making repairs and gives you the flexibility to jump from house to house once your rental contract is up. If you are somebody that knows autobody, craves customization and ownership, wants to commit long-term and possesses the ability to diagnose and make repairs on your vehicle, buying may be the best route for you. If you prefer to drive a new vehicle without having to worry about maintenance costs and are comfortable with always having a monthly payment – leasing might be your best bet.

Here’s more good news – you aren’t stuck on one path for your entire life. Feel free to try out both options if it makes sense for both your budget and your lifestyle!


Like I said above, it’s common for people to have a very definitive opinion on this debate. Let’s hear yours!

3 Key Money Tips for High Schoolers

No matter how old you are – you likely aren’t satisfied with the amount of money you have and you want more. When you are in high school, you want to be able to buy the things you want, go out with your friends, and maybe even save for your future education. So, if you are a high schooler – here are a few things you can do with your money to make it work best for you!


Use these tips to make that cash you earned in your summer job last a little longer:

1. Make sure you have BOTH a debit and savings account.

Even if you primarily get your money in cash right now, you should be putting it in an account so you can make more. The sooner you open a bank account, including a separate savings account, the better. This is to get used to dealing with your money when it only exists on plastic and in your banking app and so you have somewhere to stash your savings separate from your spending money. Also, it saves you from having to check the pockets in all of your jeans or the bottom of the washing machine to try and find that extra $20 bill you stashed away for safe keeping.

2. Talk about money.

A lot of people’s parents or guardians don’t talk about money. Sometimes it’s because they’re not good with money themselves and sometimes people are just weird with their financial information, even with their kids. If your parents shut down conversations about budgeting or how much their mortgage or car payments are, that’s where the first piece of advice comes in. If you are a member of a financial institution, you have access to financial experts who can help you out or direct you to reliable resources. If you’re wondering anything about money, chances are someone else has googled that same question! Don’t feel embarrassed if you need to google how to read your first paycheck or what compound interest is (trust me, you want to know what that one is)!

3. Get to saving!

Yeah, you probably don’t make very much right now, but the idea is that if you start making saving a habit now, it will feel natural when you’re making more money. If you save just 10% of every dollar you earn, you’re setting yourself up for success. Right now you have time on your side, which means that your money has the power to make more money by just sitting in an account with good interest, or through an investment.

Let’s say you open a savings account with a 3% interest rate and you contribute just $10 each month for 10 years. On top of the $1,200 you’ve invested, you will have made an additional $200 just by having the money sit there. That’s the power of time (and compound interest)! Don’t believe me? Check out our Savings Calculator to plug in different values to show how much you can grow your account through time and some simple savings behaviour. That’s way more than you’d make by just keeping the cash in a jar in your bedside nightstand. Plus, this way, it’s safe from your snoopy brothers and sisters!

That’s it! Three simple ways to start saving so you can start building that bank account nice and early.

Setting Resolutions for a Financially Healthy Year

Before the clock strikes midnight on New Years, we typically already have a list of resolutions that will help us in the upcoming year. Why not focus a few of these resolutions  on bettering your financial situation? Let’s get you thinking about some of these resolutions that could get 2020 started on a financially stable foot.


Every year you probably set yourself a resolution or two. “I’m going to read at least one book every month!”, “I’m going to eat healthier!” or “I’m going to get active!” That’s awesome, but have you ever considered what financial resolutions you could be setting?

If the goal is improvement (which it always is) why not set out to improve your finances, too? Doing so might even help you meet some of your other goals because those fresh veggies and gym memberships to fulfill your other resolutions don’t always come cheap.

We’re all at different stages in our lives and priorities are going to be different for everyone and will vary as your lifestyle change. Here are some examples of financial resolutions you may want to set for yourself this year. See what makes sense for where you’re at right now.

  • Pay down your debt – set a percentage or dollar figure goal if it’s too much to tackle in a single year
  • Save for a down payment on a house, condo, or cabin
  • Save for two month’s rent plus damage deposit and moving costs in order to rent an apartment
  • Become more financially literate – read books or articles, or speak to a financial expert
  • Save 10% of your income every single month
  • Teach your kids about money
  • Make a budget and stick to it
  • Improve or start working on your credit score
  • Earn more income
  • Save to buy that expensive thing you want upfront – like a big vacation, new car, or renovation
  • Donate a set monthly amount to a cause or charity that you love
  • Figure out how much you really need to retire, and work out how to get there
  • Start an emergency fund
  • Make your money work harder – if you’ve been crushing goals you might be in a place to start investing for bigger returns than your current savings account offers

All of these are really just some basic ideas to get you thinking about what financial resolutions you could set this year. Remember that your goals should always be SMART – Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic and Timely.

How TO Fall for a Scam

Yes, you read that right. Fraud is not new and is something that’s been around for a long time – we all know a family member, friend or co-worker who has fallen victim to a scam. We all think “it will never happen to me” but it’s easier than you think to fall for a fraudster. Let’s take a look at how it can happen.   


With ever-growing technology, we’re seeing an increase in the number of scams out there and between 2014-2016, it’s estimated Canadians lost over $290 million to fraudsters. Scams and fraud can originate through a variety of different channels including phone, email and social media, and some of the top scams include romance scams, income tax extortion scams and phishing.  

 Here are a few tips on how to protect your information and detect one of the scams out there: 

Caught in a bad romance 

 Gone are the days of having to go to the bar or local hangout to meet that special someone. With the growth of technology, many relationships nowadays are starting online. 

Unfortunately, this has also caused an increase in romance scams and, in 2018, Canadians lost more than $22.5 million to this type of scam. That’s a lot of money that could have paid for heartbreak chocolate and ice cream.

A romance scams usually starts with a fake profile on an online dating site or social network and the scammer pretends to be someone they’re not by using a fake name, photos, etc. The scammer will build a fake relationship with you over a short period of time and often professes their love for you early on. Just as the ‘relationship’ is getting ‘serious’, your new bae will have a financial emergency such as a health issue or wants to visit you in person and needs you to send money. After you’ve sent the money, they’ll continue to ask for more… and more… or they’ll stop communicating with you altogether.  

Don’t let love blind you and use these tips to protect your money and your heart. 

  • Look at the photo – does it look real? Many scammers use photos from the web for their profiles.  Check to see if the photo is real, not stolen, by doing a reverse image lookup 
  • If the person can never video chat or keeps finding excuses not to meet up, it’s probably because they aren’t who they say they are. This is called “catfishing”. 
  • Never… ever… under any circumstances send them money for any reason, especially if you have never met them in person.  

Congradulations! Your our sweapstakes winner! 

Phishing is a common type of fraud that often comes in the form of a prize, threats such as your bank account being locked and you must take immediate action to open it, or a refund due to an overpayment on your account. Scammers will use a variety of channels including phone & text, email and fake websites.    

Don’t take the bait and follow these tips to recognize when you’re being phished: 

  • Most scam emails and texts contain spelling errors, bad grammar or altered logos. At first glance, it may look real, but upon further inspection something may be wrong like the sub-heading above. Did you notice the spelling errors in our heading or did you have to scroll back up for a second glance? 
  • Check the link before clicking on it by holding your cursor over link to display the full URL. If it looks suspicious, it probably is. Instead, contact the company directly or visit its website to confirm if any actions are required from you. 
  • Beware of urgent or threatening language. Causing a sense of urgency or fear is a common phishing tactic in order to draw an impulsive decision from you. 

No one cares that your first cat’s name was Fluffy 

 Raise your hand if you’ve seen a quiz or survey filled out by one of your friends pop up in your social media feed. Now raise your hand again if you’ve ever done one of these quizzes or surveys and shared with your followers.  

I’m also guilty.

With social media, we’re seeing more than ever people sharing information about themselves online.  Yes, it may be fun to reminisce on your past and share all the things you love such as the name of your first pet or the make of your first car, but you know who also loves this information… scammers! 

Sharing this info can be a goldmine for hackers and fraudsters as it helps them build their knowledge of information about you even more. A lot of the time, we also choose security questions for our different accounts related to the answers of these questions, putting us at further risk of being hacked.  This also allows fraudsters to build a profile around you so that they can confidently walk into a bank and pretend to be you. 

Reduce the risk and stop oversharing information about yourself on social media as well as: 

  • Choose security questions and answers that can’t easily be guessed. Your mother’s maiden name may be an easy one for you to remember, but it’s also an easy one for fraudsters to google. 
  • Don’t share photos of your personal and financial information such as your driver’s license or new credit card.
  • If going away on vacation, don’t share details on social media before you go or while you’re there. Doing so is equivalent to saying “I’m not home right now, please feel free to come break in and steal my stuff, especially the new TV I just posted on Instagram.”
  • Make your accounts and posts private so that only those you know and trust can see what you’re up to. Don’t be afraid to prune the friend-tree every once and a while. If you don’t know what someone has been up to in a while, you also have no idea if their account has been hacked.

The sophistication of fraudsters is increasing and as organizations raise the bar on security, fraudsters up their tactics to try and trick us into giving them information and our money. For more information about protecting yourself from fraud and to learn about different scams out there, visit https://www.canada.ca/en/services/finance/fraud.html 


Ever fallen victim to a fraudster or know someone who has? Comment below with how they tricked you to save someone else!

Condo or condon’t? Is condo living right for you?

Purchasing a house is a huge decision and choosing the type of home you buy adds a whole other layer. Let’s break down all things condos so that you can make sure you think about all the options because after all, you’re the one who will have to live with it – or in this case, in it.


Are you currently considering purchasing a home for the first time? Or are you possibly looking to downsize from a house to a condo? Before making a purchase, especially one as big as a house, it’s important to weigh all the pros and cons. As a current condo owner for the past three years, I’ve started a list of things to consider to help you decide if condo life is right for your lifestyle.

Condo Pros

Condo living comes with a lot of pros – here are some that I would consider positive:

  • Low Maintenance – Condos usually come with snow removal and landscaping built into condo fees.
  • Affordability – Condos tend to be lower in price and newer, so you get more bang for your buck.
  • Amenities – If you get lucky, your condo could have access to some extra amenities, such as a pool, fitness centre, clubhouse, meeting space, BBQ, underground parking, gated community park, etc. These extra amenities could also help you save money on other expenses, like no gym membership or sharing a BBQ.
  • Less Hidden Costs – What you see is what you get with a condo. There are usually no extra costs when it comes to shingle repair, deck, landscaping, etc.
  • Location, Location, Location – Many condos are located close to downtown or commercial developments so you’re usually within walking distance to city attractions.
  • Size – Bigger doesn’t have to be better, especially when it comes to cleaning a big house or buying furniture to fill it. Depending on the condo, they usually give you a good size designed for comfortable living for families while allowing space for storage.
  • Utility Savings – Sometimes utility costs are built into your condo fees which means you share utility costs with your fellow tenants. This can be a blessing or a curse (depending if you have neighbours who love to take 45 minute showers), but by sharing utility costs – you avoid having to pay setup and maintenance fees. You also don’t have to worry about paying multiple bills during the month.
  • Board Experience – Each condo building typically has a Condo Board that makes decisions for your facility like the use of your reserve fund and any increases/decreases to your condo fees. If you are looking to gain Board experience, this is a great place to start while also having a say in what happens in your neighborhood.

Condo Cons

Here are some of the cons that come with condo living that I would suggest you consider before committing to a condo:

  • Close Quarters – You’re usually sharing walls with neighbours resulting in loud distributions and lack of privacy. I used to live beside a neighbour who had a dog that really missed them when they got home from their nightly shift work at 4:00 a.m.
  • Difficulty Re-Selling – Depending on the market, a condo can generally take longer to sell since condo living is not for everyone, market saturation or too many condos are on the re-sale market.
  • Lack of Back Yard – One luxury I wish I had access to would be a bigger back yard. I do have something (and by “something” I mean a strip of shared grass), but it is tough to entertain during the summer when you don’t have access to a large lawn or privacy from your neighbours.
  • Rules – Condos tend to have set rules that vary per condo like “quiet time”, no pets, renovation restrictions, no smoking, etc. unlike living in a stand along home where you are generally free to do what you want to do.
  • Condo Fees – As mentioned in the pros, condos come with condo fees that go towards the building upkeep, shared utilities such as hydro, electric, grounds keeping and a reserve fund for emergencies (although this could be considered a positive – yay for savings!). The older your condo building is, the higher your condo fees can be as there is generally an uptick in the amount of upkeep needed for the building.

When purchasing a home, I highly recommend making a good ol’ fashioned pro and con list for each separate property because it’s highly unlikely you will find a home that has absolutely everything and a list will help weigh your options so you can find out what you can live with and what you can’t live without.


Do you or have you lived in a condo and have any pros and cons to consider? Comment below!

How To Break Up With Your Bank

To switch or not to switch… that is the question! Switching banks has never been described as an easy or fun task. But what if I could help make the process a bit easier for you? I can’t promise it will be fun, but if you’re already feeling that itch to switch – it will be worth it in the long run.


Got the itch to switch?

So what would make someone get the itch to switch? There are many reasons why someone would want to make a break from their current bank. You could be going through a big life change that challenges you to review your relationship with your current bank. For example, moving to another city for that new job opportunity might make you switch if  you want to do your banking close to home. If you’re recently married like me, you and your hubby would have gone through a debate to decide whose bank gets the honour of opening your joint account.  You could also be looking for better rates because who doesn’t love a good deal? Honestly, as much as a good deal gets me going, the real value is finding someone that treats you like a person and not an account number. Whatever the reason may be, if you’re not happy then it is time to make a change!

How do you do that? I don’t know about you but I like a good checklist so let’s break it down step by step.

Step 1: Browse the options

You wouldn’t buy a book without reading the back and you wouldn’t buy a car off the lot without taking it for a test drive. Your bank shouldn’t be any different. Browse your options and ask yourself want do you want from your financial institution. Things to consider:

  • Would you rather a bank or a credit union? Don’t think there is much of a difference? There is and we’ve broken it down for you in a previous MONEYTALK blog.
  • What is your banking style? In a branch, online, or maybe a mixture of both? Check out what each financial institution specializes in.
  • Is it important that your financial institution is involved and supports your community in which you work, live and play? Take a look at what/how much they support.
  • Most importantly, ask what’s in it for you!

Evaluate your options and take a couple of your top draft picks out for a test drive. I recommend meeting with a representative from the option you are considering to see if they are a right fit for you and can provide what you are missing from your relationship with your current financial institution.

Step 2: Open a new account

You’ve done your research, played the field and now you’re ready to commit… what’s next? Jump in with both feet and open a new account. Most financial institutions offer a variety of ways to open up an account. If you want the human interaction, visit your local branch in your community or if you want the ease and convenience from your couch – there are typically online options (if there isn’t and that is something you value most – return to Step 1).

Pro Tip: Once the account is opened – make a small deposit into your new account to make sure everything is running smoothly.

Step 3: Identify monthly expenses and set up automatic payments

Make a list of your automatic payments that come out of your account on a bi-weekly, monthly and yearly basis. You’ll want to set these up on your new account. Some common automatic transactions to think about:

  • Your hard earned dollars: Direct deposits
  • The roof over your head: Mortgage payments
  • Subscription to chill: Netflix account
  • One more song: Apple Music/Spotify Premium
  • Connection to the world: Cellphone payments
  • License to Leg Day: Gym Membership fees 

Step 4: Transfer majority of your money

You’ve set up your automatic payments and now you have to make sure you have money in there to pay them. Time to transfer the majority of your money into your new account. Key word here is “majority” of your money.

Pro Tip: It’s a good idea to keep some of your money in your old account just in case that pesky internet bill slipped through the cracks.

Having said that, keep your old account open for at least a month to ensure you haven’t missed any of those automatic transactions. When all is clear, transfer the rest of your money into your new account.

Step 5: Closing time

Last, but definitely not least, is to close your account, I repeat CLOSE your account! Just because the balance is zero doesn’t mean it is closed and your bank will continue charging you fees until it is officially closed. Avoid having a “fee”k out when you realize the account was reopened and you now owe your ex-bank money. Contact your bank to ask how to officially close your account and get the closure you need.

 

If you’re feeling that itch to switch don’t be afraid to make a change. At the end of the day, your finances are one of the most important aspects in your life and you should feel safe, valued and confident with your financial institution.

Have any tips for the switch? Let’s hear ’em! Share by using the comment section below to save any headaches for those looking to break up with their bank.

 

4 Quick Tips to Save on Insurance

Home insurance. Life insurance. Car insurance. All important to have, ensuring you’re financially protecting yourself in case of emergency. With each insurance type comes many different options as well as a number of ways you can save. Here are a few savings tips and advice to look into when purchasing (or renewing) insurance.

Home savings that can be spent elsewhere

A part of homeownership includes purchasing home insurance to ensure you’re covered for loss or damage to your property due to unforeseen situations. Home insurance is a must, especially if you live in a condo, townhouse or apartment and share walls with a neighbour. You may trust yourself to not start a fire but you never know when your neighbour will find a way to set a bowl of ramen noodles ablaze. Some insurance companies offer different discounts to help reduce the cost of your home insurance including discounts for:

  • Having a monitored security system
  • Being claims-free for several years
  • Your age and the number of years you’ve been with the company
  • Having a good credit score

A big misconception that comes with buying insurance is that it is a standardized rate among all suppliers. When choosing home insurance, be sure to shop around for the best rates and ask what discounts each company can offer you.

Safe driving does pay off

SGI’s Safe Driver Recognition program rewards drivers with a discount on their vehicle insurance for safe driving. For each year you drive without an incident, you earn a safety point that corresponds to a discount on your vehicle’s plate insurance. As you can earn safety points, you can also lose points for unsafe driving such as speeding, accident, etc. If your safety wasn’t enough motivation to put the phone away while driving, one texting and driving ticket wipes away the points that would have taken you four years to accumulate. That could mean an additional $200 on top of the $280 ticket.

Bundling up

Some insurers will offer discount incentives if you purchase multiple insurances from them. The most common insurance bundles include home insurance and car insurance. When you are shopping around, check how much money you can save by bundling. It’s also very convenient for when renewal time comes around to do it all at once so you don’t have to wonder all year “Wait… is my car insurance due in March? Or is that home insurance?”

Improving your health

Life insurance prepares you for the unexpected and helps protect the people you love if something were to happen to you. When choosing life insurance, consider your family and work situation, life goals and your budget.

If you’re a smoker, your insurance premiums will be higher than a non-smoker. Now you may be thinking, well I just won’t tell my insurance provider that I smoke so I don’t pay as much. Wrong – don’t do this because if you hide it and it’s discovered you’ve been lying, your insurance could be rejected. On a positive note, if you need that extra reason to quit smoking, some insurance companies will consider you a non-smoker if you’ve been smoke-free for a year and will reduce your premiums. Not only will you be able to save on insurance, you’ll also be saving money due to no longer buying your cigarettes. Bonus, Smoker’s Helpline has a Quit to Win Contest where you can enter to win $500 cash if you quit smoking.

 

Whenever you’re purchasing insurance of any kind, be sure to do your research and shop around for the best rate. Always ask questions and inquire about any discounts your provider may offer.

Know of other discounts or incentives to save money on insurance? I’d love to hear them – share with me by using the comment section below.

Man and woman sitting on couch talking about finances

Honey, can we talk finances?

Does just the topic of finances with your significant other cause great stress in your lives?  In this blog, we will identify possible causes and how to turn “Honey, can we talk finances” from a negative to a positive.


What discussion topics are avoided in your household – politics, sex, in-laws… money??   I hear ya.  Do your money talks turn into the “Blame Game” or worse yet, don’t happen at all? Why is one of the most important things that impact our entire lives constantly being avoided?

We hear how money has been the leading cause of divorce/breakups for years but we still don’t talk about our finances as often as we should.  My co-workers laughed when I told them I wanted to name my blog “Just shut up and do it yourself” but sometimes that is exactly how we feel.   Am I right?

What’s the underlying issue?

  • Communication – Can you have an honest discussion about your financial situation without shaming, blaming or walking away? Struggling to manage one’s finances is common — but talking honestly and openly about it is not.  Do you only talk about finances when a disaster strikes?
  • Fear – Are you financial literacy savvy? What is your level of understanding? Nobody wants to look stupid or admit they don’t know.  Let’s face it, if your parents didn’t teach you and you didn’t learn it in school, how can you be expected to make informed decisions.
  • Upbringing – My parents never talked in front of us kids or taught us about finances. We had food, clothing, a roof over our heads – we never questioned how it got there. It just magically appeared. No worries. Depending on how the subject was approached or avoided in your household may impact your spending and saving habits.
  • Financial habits – Are you and your significant other financially compatible? Are you savers, spenders, or a combination? Two spenders without a plan – a harmonious relationship tend not to be had – unless you are a multi-millionaire at birth.  On the other hand, two savers might miss out on experiencing life.
  • Goals – Are you in it together? Do you have the same goals – homeowner, kids, early retirement? Do you share all the responsibilities and decisions or do you divide and conquer?

How can we fix this? 

  1. Communicate. Communicate. Communicate!
  • Commit to a time with no interruptions to discuss life goals – short and long term. What do you truly want out of life?  What is your current situation?  What is in the past is in the past; deal with the here and now.   Keep calm at all costs.  Experts suggest you do so on your 3rd date as this conversation is just as important as the marriage and children talk.
  1. Plan. Plan. Plan!
  • Schedule a monthly review of your short term finances:
    • Are all the bills paid and needs met – food, shelter, clothing?
    • Do you have any upcoming expenses – car repairs, insurance, taxes, dentist, renos?
    • Make a budget: don’t make it too restricted or you won’t stick to it. Factor in some fun and “nice to have’s” and an emergency fund for life’s uh oh’s.
  • Schedule a yearly review to look at the bigger picture, long term goals – buying a house, having kids/having more kids, investments, retirement. Definitely review sooner if you experience a life-changing situation.
  • Schedule a financial health checkup with a professional financial advisor at your financial institution. They will be able to ensure you are on track to meeting your goals and can also be useful mediators if need be.
  1. Educate. Educate. Educate!
  • Knowledge is money. We don’t deal with things when we don’t know anything about them or we make bad decisions. Pick a financial product and research it, attend workshops, watch YouTube, read more of our blogs or visit our website.  There is lots of great info and tools at your fingertips.
  1. Teach. Teach. Teach!
  • Talk to your children about finances, don’t exclude them.  You don’t have to divulge everything but your decisions do impact them. Teach them the basics and help arm the next generation with the tools they need to be financially successful.  Who knows you might be in their care in the future.  Make sure it is a nice place.

At the end of the day, talking to your spouse or significant other about your finances is important early on and continually throughout your relationship.  Don’t forget!!

Haven’t had a #moneytalk in a while!  What are you waiting for?  Schedule your talk now!!

What advice do you have to make the #moneytalk easier?  Share with us by commenting below.  We would love to hear them.

engaged couple holding a sign that says I said yes!

I’m engaged! Now what?

Being newly engaged is such an exciting time and an important part of the wedding milestone. But it’s important to put down all the wedding magazines and hold booking venues, to take some time to enjoy the engagement bliss and focus on your wedding budget with your partner first.


Congratulations! Now it’s time to freak out

Your turn has come where you’re finally engaged to be married and the first few moments are blissful and celebratory. Before you know it, the champagne flutes are empty and your Pinterest board has more pins than a sewing kit. It doesn’t take you long for the stress to kick in and you start asking yourself, ‘How am I ever going to afford my dream wedding?’

Hit pause

In the first month after you get engaged, it’s very important to take time to let these special moments soak in and avoid making big decisions. Instead, talk to your partner and discuss one-on-one what you both want your wedding to look like. This can be a challenge, especially as you may be tempted to make decisions right away and people are asking you every day if you’ve started planning. To avoid these inevitable questions have a planned response such as, “We haven’t started planning much, but we’re thinking a small wedding sometime next summer.” This will usually end the conversation without being rude or opening yourself up to outside opinions – trust me, you’ll get them.

Start the budget

Warning: you’ll want to sit down for this.

Now that you’ve taken time to soak up the first part of the engagement and have those crucial conversations with your partner on what you want your wedding day to look like, it’s time to get started with wedding planning. Before deciding on a venue, guests, or what your flowers will look like, you’ll first need to tackle setting a budget for your special day. It can be a lot and I recommend taking it one step at a time as to avoid feeling overwhelmed – start with these 3 steps:

  1. Decide on a wedding budget – This can sometimes start with conversations on who else would be contributing to your wedding and what dollar amount they are putting in. From there you will know how much will be coming out of your own pocket. Make sure your budget includes everything from rings, gifts, to finally the honeymoon. It’s also important to leave a 5% – 10% contingency in case you go over.
  2. List your priorities – Decide what’s most important to you as a couple. Is it food? Then spend more on food. Maybe it’s music – be willing to spend more on entertainment. If it’s just simply having everyone there, the more people usually come with a bigger price tag so you’ll need to compromise on other items, like no dinner and instead do a canapé hour.
  3. Get a budgeting tool – I like using Wedding Wire Budget Planner because it tracks all my categories for spending, tallies the costs against my total decided budget and sends reminders for payments. The biggest mistake you can make is not tracking your spending and costs get out of control pushing you off budget.

Now that your budget and priorities are decided the fun stuff can begin! Start doing your research on venues and vendors and try to stay calm when you see price quotes come back – that’s why you made a budget at the start. The fact is, weddings are expensive and the average cost of a Canadian wedding in 2018 was $27,000, but this doesn’t mean that’s what your wedding needs to cost. Don’t get hung up on what other people are doing and instead focus on what is right for you as a couple and what fits within your budget.

Are you married or getting married? I’d love to know what your wedding budget was/is as well as any challenges you had when it came to your budget and costs related to your wedding. As well, do you have any wedding cost saving tips? Comment below to share and be sure to check back soon for future wedding advice and tip blogs.