van with luggage tied to top, driving on a beach

Planning a vacation? Consider this to save & be prepared

Planning a vacation somewhere hot? Or maybe to the mountains to hit up the slopes? Whatever your travel plans may be, here are a few tips to help you save and be prepared for your next vacation.


A recent Ipsos poll showed that 59% of Canadians said they aren’t confident they’ll take a vacation this winter. Given the deep freeze we’ve been experiencing here in Saskatchewan recently, some may be reconsidering. If you’re planning a trip this year, or in the future, here are a few things to consider to save you money as well as be prepared for your travels.

Do your research

You wouldn’t buy a car without doing your research, would you? The same rules should apply when planning a vacation. Go online or talk to a travel agent to determine the best options for you. You don’t need to plan every detail down to the minute, but knowing when you want to travel, where you want to go and how you want to get there will help you start gathering information on what best meets your needs and your wallet.

Avoid travelling during the peak season times

We know this isn’t always possible, especially if wanting to travel when your kids are out of school, but travelling during the off-season could mean lower prices. Christmas break and family week break tend to be busier and more expensive. Being flexible on your travel dates, sometimes by just a day or two, can help you not only save money but also avoid the crowds.

Look for seat sales

Many airlines offer seat sales throughout the year, especially to celebrate holidays and events such as Canada Day or Cyber Monday. Watch for these sales and compare airline prices to find your best price. A great app to use is Hopper – not only does it compare prices for you, it also send you a notification the instant a price drops. Don’t rush into booking your tickets. Allow yourself some time to watch ticket prices over a longer period of time. The extra time spent could keep a few extra dollars in your pocket.

Unfortunately, we know all too well the feeling of booking a flight and then seeing it go on sale a few days later. If this happens, be aware of any price guaranteed rules your airline may have. Some airlines will honour the new price within a certain time period from booking.

Utilize family discounts

If travelling with kids, look for family-friendly retailers that offer family discounts. There are many hotels and vacation packages that offer discounts such as kids stay and eat free. There may be a few restrictions, but it’s worth the money you could save in the end.

Get travel insurance

It’s always important to be prepared for the unexpected. Before travelling, know what type of travel insurance you have and purchase any additional insurance if necessary. When looking to see what coverage you have, be sure to check out any insurance your employer or financial institution may offer. Many credit cards also provide insurance if the card is used for booking/purchasing. If you’re unsure what insurance your financial institution offers, contact them directly to find out.

Protect your finances

Like at home, you should also protect yourself and your information when travelling. Only take cash, debit and credit cards that you’ll be using on the trip and leave the rest at home. Use your hotel room’s safe to store your items when you’re not using them such as extra cash, credit cards and valuable items (e.g., laptop, camera, phone, etc.). In the unfortunate event that you lose or have your card stolen, contact your financial institution immediately.

Whether travelling to a hot destination or just to the next province over, there are many ways you could save money. With all of the excitement of a trip, it is also important that you prepare yourself for the unexpected and keep yourself protected.

Are you planning a vacation this year? What other tips do you have that help you save money? We’d love to hear them – join the conversation by commenting below. Safe travels.

man kick boxing

Kick-start your finances: goal setting

Setting financial goals helps you to figure out what’s important, focus on priorities and analyze your wants vs. your needs. 


We all dream about what we want to do and what we want to achieve. From going on a vacation, paying off debt, putting money away for our child’s education or having enough money set aside for retirement; these dreams become our goals and like most things, have a financial component to them.

Unsure of where to start? Taking the time to set goals will provide you with an understanding of your big picture. It allows you to figure out what’s important to you, focus on priorities and analyze your needs vs. your wants. Below you will find some advice on creating realistic and achievable financial goals, helping you make tomorrow, today.

Creating goals

There are three types of goals:

  1. Short-term Goals: These are goals that you can achieve in a short amount of time – less than one year – and can include things such as a minor home renovation, paying off a credit card or starting an emergency fund. These goals can also be shorter goals that contribute to a larger, long-term goal such as starting to put a small amount of money away for retirement.
  2. Intermediate Goals: These goals take a bit longer to achieve – between one to five years. Saving money for a down-payment on a home or saving for a family vacation are great examples that may fit into this category.
  3. Long-term Goals: These goals tend to be longer – 10+ years. These goals are often re-assessed throughout the course of their timeframes to ensure you’re on track and often are adjusted due to changing situations/environments. Some examples of long-term goals may include saving for your child’s education, paying off a student loan or saving enough money to retire.

Now that you know the different types of goals, write down your short-term, intermediate, and long-term goals for 2018. When making a list think about things such as:

  • What makes you happy? (e.g., family, vacation)
  • What makes you stressed? (e.g., credit card debt)
  • What do you wish you had? (e.g., new furniture)
  • What things do you like doing? (e.g., traveling, spending time with friends)
  • Where do you see yourself in one year? (e.g., taking a hot vacation) Five years? (e.g., having a down payment for a home) Ten years? (e.g., having my student loans paid off)
  • What does having overall financial well-being mean to you? (e.g., understanding my money and not having to worry if I’ll have enough when I retire.)

When setting your goals include specifics, such as costs and timelines. Also look to see if your goals are realistic and achievable. Small goals are easier to reach and help train your brain into believing you can achieve it. This can also increase your chance of success in future goals. Below is an example of how you can take the things important to you and group into short-term, intermediate and long-term goals.

Prioritize. Prioritize. Prioritize.

Once you have your goals written and organized, it’s time to prioritize. This will help you understand what’s most important and where you should focus your time, money and energy.

Though it is great to have lots of goals, actually achieving them all may be difficult. You must take a look at your goals and ensure they’re also realistic and achievable when you look at them all together. It’s important to set yourself up for success and work within your means.

Prioritizing will also allow you to make any adjustments needed to make these goals achievable. When prioritizing ask yourself:

  • If you could only achieve one of these items, which one would it be?
  • Are there any goals on my list that are needs vs. wants?
  • How long do I have to achieve this goal – is that a must or can it be adjusted?
  • Can I break any of my larger goals into smaller goals?
  • Can I put a hold on any of these goals and begin working on only once I have completed another goal?

When prioritizing and making adjustments, be aware of how achieving these goals will impact your finances now. Online calculators can help you understand exactly what you need to do now to achieve your goal within your timeline. Depending on your current financial situation and the impact your goal will have (e.g., monthly contributions), you may need to re-adjust or plan your goals differently.

Team effort

If you are married or have a significant other in which you share financial responsibilities with, it’s essential you work together when creating your financial goals. Work together to develop a list of goals and discuss what’s a priority and what’s not. Together, determine what is achievable and ensure you’re on the same page – if not, you could be setting yourself up for failure. Once set, be each other’s motivation and hold each other accountable to help ensure success.

Talk to your financial advisor

The most important thing you can do once you’ve created and prioritized your list of goals is to talk with your financial advisor. They will be able to provide you with advice on your goals and help you look at the big picture. They may also identify any obstacles that impact you reaching these goals and provide guidance on what types of adjustments can be made. Your financial advisor will also be able to tell you which products, such as RRSPs, Tax-Free Savings Accounts, mutual funds, etc., you should consider helping contribute towards your success.

When it comes to kick-starting your finances, start off by understanding what’s important to you and what you want to achieve with your finances.  Create short-term, intermediate, and long-term goals and prioritize accordingly. Once you’re done, make an appointment with your financial advisor to discuss and determine what tools and resources are available to help you succeed. Don’t have a financial advisor, no worries – you can request financial advice here.

sparkler

Being real with your New Year’s resolutions

Only about 8% of people actually achieve their New Year’s resolutions. Here we explain why and help you to set resolutions that are achievable.


Have you ever said to yourself that you will start doing something tomorrow, yet tomorrow never comes? Or had a bunch of New Year’s resolutions that you quickly gave up on and added back to your list the next year?

You’re not alone. When it comes to New Year’s resolutions, approx. 8% of people actually achieve them. But why is that? The answer… you.

When it comes to setting New Year’s resolutions we tend to set the expectations way too high, setting ourselves up for failure right from the start. And if the resolution is achievable, many times we don’t make the effort or change our behaviours that would allow us to succeed.

We need to stop setting ourselves up for failure and really focus on making tomorrow, today. Whether you want to improve your personal fitness and nutrition, focus on your finances or quit bad habits, you need to ensure your goals are attainable and provide a realistic expectation, a target date and an action plan on how you will achieve your goal.

Example 1: attainable goals

For example, in 2018 you want to increase the number of days you go to the gym from once a week to four times a week. Instead of jumping in feet first, set a target date and slowly incorporate a new gym day into your weekly routine until you are up to four gym days a week. Create an action plan on when you will go to the gym by booking time in your calendar in advance. By writing it down, you’ll be more motivated to do it and won’t be tempted to book yourself for something else.

Success will also require you to make changes to your lifestyle and behaviours. New Year’s resolutions won’t happen on their own and you must take action or make changes to see results.

Example 2: changing behaviours

Your 2018 resolution is to save money by cutting out your morning coffee purchase. In order to do this though, you must change your behaviour in stopping each morning. You may also need to create a new habit of making a coffee at home each morning to eliminate the temptation of stopping, which in the end will help you succeed.

Changing behaviours can be hard and you must be consistent in order for them to become a part of your everyday norm. According to a study published in the European Journal of Social Psychology, it takes a minimum of 21 days to form or change a habit. That doesn’t seem too long when you read it but can feel like forever when trying to do it. Don’t panic though – stay consistent and hold yourself accountable – within time, you won’t even remember what the old norm was.

The key to achieving your New Year’s resolution is ensuring it’s attainable and having an action plan that helps you succeed. When it comes to your financial planning resolutions, we’re here to help.

Starting Jan. 1, we’re challenging you to Kick-Start Your Finances by taking our 6-week challenge. Each week, we’ll be tackling a new topic related to you and your money and we encourage you to join us along the way. Together, we can build an action plan and help you take control of your finances in 2018. Join us next week to learn more and take the challenge!

Happy New Year!

busy shopping mall

Boxing Day shop like a champ

Take the stress out of Boxing Day shopping by following a few of these tips that will help make the best of your time, money and sanity.


We understand Boxing Day can be quite chaotic especially when you start to think about the large crowds, long lines and the amount of money exchanging hands. A survey by RetailMeNot.ca showed that Canadians could spend as much as $600 this year on Boxing Day and New Years. When asked how in-store Boxing Day shopping made Canadians feel, it isn’t surprising to hear 77% said “overwhelming”.

To help with that overwhelming feeling, we’ve put together a few tips to help you prepare for Boxing Day shopping and make the best of your time, money and sanity!

Create a game plan

Boxing Day can be full of temptations and impulse buying. Setting a game plan in advance will ensure you shop with intention and help you avoid those unnecessary purchase.

Prior to shopping, make a list of the things you are wanting to buy. Prioritize the list and identify want vs need purchases. Are all the items on your list an absolute must-need?

Next part of your plan should be to set a budget prior to Boxing Day shopping. Without one, you can easily spend more than you’re comfortable with causing buyer’s remorse and stress later on. Use this budget to re-evaluate your list and determine if there are any items you could reconsider purchasing or that you can purchase at a later date.

Do your research

Research before venturing out for the day, taking a look at flyers, going online or even using apps such as Flipp to compare item prices at different stores. Write down the stores you plan on visiting to buy the items on your list. Use this list to map out your route to help save travel time and gas! Be sure to only stop at places on your list.

Another thing to look for when researching is week-long Boxing Day sales. Many retailers now extend their Boxing Day sales for the length of the week to reduce a bit of shopping chaos. Instead of going out into the crowds all in one day, are there any items you can purchase throughout the week that allow you to still get the sale price? This can also help reduce the feeling of being overwhelmed by not trying to make your purchases all in one day

Consider online shopping

Many retailers will also have Boxing Day sales through their online sites, some even starting a few days before or right at 12:01 a.m. Boxing Day. The only downside to online shopping is having to wait for the item to ship. Depending on the item, is it an absolute must that you need the item right that second or can you wait a few days until it arrives in the mailbox?

If online shopping, be cautious of shipping and exchange rates. Sometimes the costs can outweigh the convenience of shopping online and there may be a few items that are better off you going to the store for.

Leave your credit cards at home

A simple way to not overspend on Boxing Day is to leave your credit cards at home. Only use cash or debit for Boxing Day purchases to help eliminate the temptation of buying something that’s not on your list.

If using cash, only bring as much as your budget. Once the cash is gone, you know it’s time to stop shopping. If using debit, keep track of your purchases by writing and totalling your amounts on a piece of paper. Once you’ve hit your limit, it’s time to go home.

Avoid group shopping

Shopping with friends can be fun, but creates opportunities for temptation. When you’re with a group, you tend to go into stores that you wouldn’t necessarily have gone into if you were by yourself which often leads to an unnecessary purchase. If you didn’t plan on going into that store originally, you most likely didn’t know that item existed – is it really something you need to buy?

Consider shopping alone or with one person. If partnering up, make a game plan together. Also, ask your friend to help you from impulse buying by having them look at your items before purchasing and providing their opinion.

If you do go into a store that you weren’t originally planning to, avoid impulse buying temptations and stick to the items on your list. Think about it… you weren’t planning to go to that store and the item you didn’t know existed nor was on your list. Just because you see the item now, is it really something you need to buy?

Avoid spending to save

We all know the deals on Boxing Day can be great but beware of the deals that make you spend more to save. A great example of this is the ‘Buy One Item, Get Another 50% Off’ deal. Yes, the second item is 50% off, but if you were only planning to purchase one in the first place, you now are paying 50% over your budget for the second item. Many stores also put the discount on the lowest priced item, which also can cause you to spend more than you were planning.

When looking for deals, be sure to read the fine print, sign and prices carefully. Also, become familiar with the store’s return policy so that if you decide you no longer want it, you are able to return it.

When it comes to a successful Boxing Day shopping haul, patience and comfortable shoes will be the most important thing. Paired with the tips above, you’ll also eliminate spending stress and hours spent in stores and lines. Happy shopping!

Credit unions vs banks: What’s the difference?

When it comes to managing your finances and choosing where to bank, there are many things to consider including whether you should choose a credit union or a bank. 


Credit unions and banks are pretty similar in the types of products and services they offer. However, there are many differences in how they operate. Whether you are looking for a new financial institution or just starting out, here are a few of the differences to help you determine which is a perfect fit for you.

Credit unions are part of the local community. They not only live, work and play within the communities they serve, but also give back to their local communities to help improve the financial well-being of their members. When it comes to managing your finances, you want to ensure the financial institution you choose has your, and your communities, best interest at heart,

At the end of the day, your financial institution should have you as their number one priority. Would you have it any other way?

holiday cup and pastry

Holiday entertainment on a budget

The holidays can be quite busy and costly, especially if you’re hosting a holiday party with family and friends. Here are a few tips on how you can save when entertaining for the holidays.


When you think of December the first few words that may come to mind are busy and expensive. From the parties, work events, concerts, school activities and more, it all starts to add up not only in costs but also time.

Hosting a party  can be a daunting task in itself and when you factor in the stress of costs, it may not seem worth it. To help save on costs, and stress, we’ve put together a few tips for holiday entertaining, ensuring to make you the hostess-with-the-mostess.

Invite guests by e-card

There are tons of great free ecard options available online that allow you to invite your guests by email. These sites are quick and easy to use and also give you the ability to design the invitation to fit your party theme. As an added bonus, some sites even allow you to manage RSVPs and message guests through the invite! A site we recommend for all your party invitation needs is www.evite.com.

Image via www.evite.com.

Host a potluck

Potlucks not only make it easier on the host but also are a great way to save on costs. Instead of planing and purchasing every food item for your event, request your guests each bring a dish.

To switch it up from the usual random potluck, select a theme and have everyone bring a dish related to that theme. You can then carry the theme throughout the rest of your party in your decorations or even a signature drink. Check out a few great potluck theme ideas here.

Borrow from the outdoors

Decorating can be the most expensive part of hosting a party. Luckily you shouldn’t need to invest too much into décor since you likely have already decorated for the holiday season. To add that something extra to your table setting, try bringing the outdoors inside by using spruce trees, branches and pine cones as your centrepiece. We love the idea of using pinecones as a name tag holder or to label your guests’ potluck dishes.

Image via DIY Cozy Home.

Holiday mug gift exchange

Having a gift exchange is a great way to get into the holiday spirit of giving. Why not put a spin on the gift exchange and ask your guests to each bring a holiday mug to your party to exchange. You can set a price limit on a mug and have your guests purchase from a local store, or you can do a re-gift only where your guests will bring a holiday mug they already own for the exchange.

Take the theme further by having a dessert hot chocolate bar where your guests can use their new mugs. Don’t forget to include the marshmallows, whip cream and all the candy fixings to go on top!

Image via Home Cooking Memories

Cozy Up With The Classics

Nothing screams the holidays like a classic holiday movie! Have your guests bring their favourite holiday movie and then get everyone to vote on which one to watch. Most votes wins. All you’ll then need to do is pop some popcorn and cozy up to watch a holiday classic!

Here are a few of our favourites:

  • It’s a Wonderful Life (1946)
  • Miracle on 34th Street (1947)
  • A Christmas Carol (1951)
  • A Charlie Brown Christmas (1965)
  • A Christmas Story (1983)
  • Home Alone (1990)
  • The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993)
  • Elf (2003)

The holidays are about gathering with loved ones, reminiscing about the past year and filling your home with joy, laughter and fun. Your party should not be measured by the amount spent, but instead on the memories made. Spending more money can make your party look more impressive, but it’s the experience and the memories you share that make the night priceless.

Home for sale sign

Mortgage stress tests: what to know

Keep hearing the term mortgage ‘stress’ test but unsure what it means to you. In this blog, we break it all down for you and provide advice on what you should consider when it comes to your mortgage.


There has been a lot of talk about the new mortgage restrictions aka “mortgage stress tests”. But with all the coverage and information out there, what does this actually mean and how does it impact you?

Starting Jan. 1, 2018, if you’re applying for a new mortgage (e.g., buying a new home), re-advancing an amount on your mortgage (e.g., renovations), or switching your mortgage to another financial institution, you’ll be subject to a “stress test”. What this means is that your advisor will assess your finances and qualifications based on a higher interest rate than what they are today.

What many don’t know is this process is already in existence for people applying for mortgages with a down payment of less than 20% of the home purchase price or those with a term of less than five years. The new restrictions will now include those who have a larger down payment and longer term time.

Credit unions are not governed federally, and provincially are not legally bound to comply with these new restrictions. However, as a mindful and trusted community partner, many credits unions already have similar policies to ensure our member’s financial well-being is a long-term focus.

“Approving a member for a mortgage that they could not afford to repay over the long term, simply to satisfy a higher purchase price, does not agree with our values as a credit union, nor increase a person’s financial wellness,” said Kris Wanner, Manager, Financial Services, Conexus Credit Union. “Also, it doesn’t promote community growth, all of which are key components to our cooperative.”

This “stress test” is being put into place to protect homeowners from rising interest rates which may impact their overall finances.  Lending rates have been at a historically low level for a number of years. Lately, we’ve seen a rise in interest rates which speaks to the why behind this stress test.

By factoring your ability to repay, and in turn how much they can spend on a home purchase, at a higher rate of interest provides you peace of mind knowing the greatest asset (and largest borrowing) you will ever have is something you can afford to repay.  It also presents the opportunity for you and your advisor to discuss the difference between “What I qualify for” and “What I can afford”.

“Being aware of your finances and your plans will give you a better understanding of what you can afford and not feel stressed,” said Wanner. “It’s also important to think of all variables when looking at affordability. Many times people forget of other expenses, which can cause them financial stress in the future.”

When it comes time to applying for a mortgage or renewing your mortgage, take a broad look at your finances and your plans – look back at what’s changed and where you want to go. Don’t forget to also look at all other factors and expenses that may be associated with homeownership, such as:

  • Property taxes;
  • Condo fees;
  • Utility bills;
  • Insurance; and
  • Home security.

Other expenses such as loan and credit card payments, food, entertainment, etc. are also important to consider.

Homeownership all starts by understanding the money you have and what you spend. Once you have an understanding, you can then create a holistic plan that works for you.

If you have any questions on what you just read or would like further information on mortgages, ask in the comments below or click the ‘Talk to us about banking button’ below to contact us.

homemade holiday gift

The secret ingredient is love: DIY gifts

Homemade is always the best type of gift. Here are a few DIY gift ideas sure to impress those you love and help you to save money.


We all know that the holiday season can be stressful. Trying to find that perfect gift for the ones you love, while also not breaking the bank. Sometimes the best gifts are the ones we personalize and that come straight from the heart with love. Here are a few DIY gift ideas that are sure to impress the ones on your list, and help you save a little on your gift giving this year.

Holiday baking

 

Nothing says I love you more than a delicious, homemade treat. The Food Network Canada has several tasty recipes that make perfect gifts this holiday season – check them out here. Consider making a few different items and packaging a variety of deliciousness in a holiday tin.

Edible gifts in a jar

Know someone who is on the go all of the time and needs a quick-fix meal? Or someone that wants to bake but without all of the hassle of buying the ingredients, etc.? Consider putting together an edible gift jar specially made for the person in mind. There are so many different options you can do from muffins, brownies, soup, salsa, jams and more. Check out 30 recipes by the Taste of Home here.

Date night jar

Date night ideas on sticks in a jar

Date Night Photo by Meaghan Morris @MeaghanMorris.com

We all know date night can get expensive – dinner, activities, babysitter, etc. The planning also can become quite exhausting. A great idea way to ensure date night does happen, without having to break the bank each time is a ‘Date Night Activity’ jar.

To create, first make a list of different date night activities – check out 101 examples here. Be sure to include items that won’t cost you anything such as going for a walk or items that will cost you very little such as going for a coffee. Organize your list into three groups: $0 Dates; Under $20 Dates; and Over $20 Dates. Then paint large popsicle sticks three different colours. Each will represent one of the groups above. Once dry, write the different date activities on the sticks based on their group colour. Put in a jar that you have decorated to say Date Night.

When it comes to date night, leave the planning up to the jar. Determine what type of date it will be – $0 date, Under $20 date or Over $20 date. Then select the corresponding coloured stick and away you go.

Movie night in

movie night at home gift basket

Movie Night Gift Basket Photo via Kidsz Paradise Inc.

Going to the movies can add up by the time you buy the tickets, drinks, popcorn and of course, paying for extra butter! A great way to save a few dollars is a ‘Movie Night In’ gift basket. Pick up a few of your favourite drinks and treats and put together in a homemade gift basket. Include a DVD or a coupon for one Netflix movie night in. The best part is that you can cozy up on the couch in your pajamas!

Gift certificates of time

Nothing beats the time we spend with our loved ones. Consider giving the gift of time by creating activity or ‘time’ gift certificates. You can include activities such as going for a walk, doing a craft or going tobogganing – the options are endless. Not only will you save money, but the memories you make will last a lifetime.

There are many different ways you can save money this holiday season and these are just a few ideas for you to use. Another great place to find homemade gift ideas is Pinterest.

Have another DIY gift idea? We’d love to hear them – share with us by commenting below.

teal piggy bank with christmas to do list

Making a list & checking it twice

Finances can be stressful, especially during the holiday season. We’re here to help. Here are a few tips and tricks to help get you through the holiday season without breaking your bank or your sanity.


Set a budget and stick to it

  • Ask yourself, “what am I comfortable spending without feeling stressed?”. Consider the gifts you will need to buy and the holiday events you will be attending. Take this amount and write it down.
  • Don’t try and plan the perfect Christmas, but instead create a budget you’re comfortable with and work in the details from there.
  • Don’t let this amount be negotiable. Set a personal goal to stick within your budget and hold yourself accountable.

Make a list & check it twice

  • Make a list of every person you plan to buy for – don’t forget to include gifts for gift exchanges, teachers, bus drivers, etc. Beside each person’s name, jot down gift ideas and the maximum amount you are willing to spend on that person. Ensure your individual amounts don’t total more than the budget you created earlier.
  • Set a small portion of your budget towards an ‘Other’ category. Use for expenses such as gift wrap, cards or for expenses incurred from holiday events such as food, drink and a safe ride home.
  • Consider homemade or personalized gifts. Make cookies or create gift certificates to spend time with your loved ones doing activities they enjoy such as reading, going for a walk, tobogganing, etc. Not only will you save money, but the memories you create will last a lifetime.

Earn extra money

  • Consider picking up a part-time job during the holiday season. Many retailers hire seasonal help, allowing you to work a few extra hours each week to earn extra cash. Put this money directly towards your holiday spending budget or into your savings account.

Start saving now

  • Open up a gift giving savings account. Each payday put a set amount into this account that you can then use to purchase gifts.
  • Put money into an account all year round. Set up automatic payments to go into an account every payday and build your gift giving savings fund for future years.

Shop around & start early

  • Don’t leave your shopping to the last minute. This can cause you to go over budget due to rushing and grabbing whatever items you can to get your shopping done in time.
  • Compare retailers that offer the same products you are wanting to purchase. Check locally or online for the best price.
  • Shop local. Not only will you find great gift ideas, but you will also be supporting local businesses within your community.
  • Take advantage of sales such as Black Friday and Cyber Monday. Check your local flyers for sales near you as many start their holiday sales early.
  • If shopping online, be aware of shipping minimums and purchase multiple items at once to save on shipping and/or qualify for free shipping.
  • Local craft shows are a great place to find personalized gifts at a great price. If you find an item over your budget, talk to the vendor and see if they can customize a piece within your price range.

Not only can these tips save you money, but also time and stress when it comes to the holiday season.

hands with money

Kids & Money: Have the #MONEYTALK today

It’s important to have the #MONEYTALK with your kids. We talked with Jacques D. to learn how he talks to his kids about money and the tools he uses.


Teaching your kids about money when they’re young can help set them up for success in the future. Not only will they have an increased knowledge and understanding of managing money when they become adults, it can also positively influence their behaviours when it comes to managing their money.

The biggest questions parents ask are how early should I start talking to my kids and what things should I teach them? We sat down with Jacques DeCorby, Conexus’ Vice President of Retail Banking, and Dad of three, to learn more about how he has the #MONEYTALK with his kids and the tools he uses.

When did you first start teaching your kids about money and what are some of the things you are teaching them?

We started talking to our kids early teaching them about the value of money and the power of savings and giving behaviours. We also talk a lot about a need vs. a want and have discussions on how money makes them feel, whether they’re saving it or spending it.

Do you give your kids an allowance? If so, when did you start and how did you determine an amount to give?

We started giving our children an allowance all around the same time, with the oldest being about ten and our youngest being five. I don’t recall how we settled on an amount to give them, but it was an amount that we could fit into our budget as well as help our kids see the value of money. We haven’t adjusted this amount, but it does make sense to periodically review the amount as it could illustrate the influence of inflation.

When teaching your kids about managing money, are there any tools you use?

We use the save-give-spend tool – pay yourself first with savings; give back and support your community; and, the remainder can be used for discretionary spending. In our household, we agreed on the split of 40-10-50 but another common split is 20-10-70.

We use this tool when splitting any money they receive including their allowance and money as gifts. With my oldest starting a part-time job, we also use this tool to help him manage his pay cheque. Though we have set these split percentages, they do have the option to put more into their savings if they chose. With three boys, it is interesting to see their different personalities – our oldest can’t spend it fast enough while our younger two are more focused on saving.

Another tool that we have introduced is the Conexus Credit Union app. At a certain age, our kids started getting their own electronic devices and phones and we made sure they added the app to their device to show them how to use it. It’s always fun to watch their reactions as they see their savings grow.

What advice do you have for parents wanting to teach their kids about money?

Save. Save. Save. Plan. Plan. Plan. Budget. Budget. Budget.

When talking to your kids about managing money, identify savings and set targets and milestones. Expose them early to different short- and long-term savings vehicles. Most importantly, let them make some spending decisions on their own after you’ve had the discussion on needs vs. wants. For example, if they really want that pack of gum at the store, have them purchase it using their own money. Be sure to follow up from time-to-time to talk about their spending decisions and ask them how it made them feel and if they’d do anything differently.

Also, as your kids become older (teens), I recommend parents start introducing the concept of credit ratings and the importance of building and maintaining a strong one.

By teaching your kids about money, what impacts can this have for them later in life?

By teaching your kids about money they’ll have an increased knowledge and understanding of managing money as they get older. More importantly, they will build positive behaviours and money management skills that will help minimize stress later in life that tends to affect so many other aspects of our overall health and well-being – physical, mental, social/family, occupational to name a few.

Any other advice you’d like to add?

It’s important that young people also start to build a strong network of trusted advisors around them including financial advisors. Talking about money can be hard, and introducing them early to money allows them to gain confidence and not be scared to ask questions when it comes to money.

Thanks Jacques! These are all great tips and advice. Financial literacy is important for all ages. We can’t wait to start having the #MONEYTALK with our kids and using some of the tools you shared with us today!

Do you talk to your kids about money? Share with us in the comments below including what age you started talking to them about money, tools you’ve used, other advice you have and more.